Bullseye Projects Emerge 2018

Tenth Biennial International Juried Kiln-Glass Exhibition for Emerging Artists

I had the honor of being selected as one of 43 finalists from over 280 entries representing 12 countries.

Emerge 2018 ran in conjunction with Evolve 2018, a curated exhibition featuring former Emerge finalists and award winners through September 18, 2018.

CLICK HERE to view the finalists' artwork.

CLICK HERE to see installation views.

_h2m5825.jpg

Komorebi (木漏れ日)

 

Komorebi is an untranslatable word. It is a compound of four characters – three kanji and the hiragana particle れ. The first kanji 木 means ‘tree’ (or ‘trees‘), the second one 漏 refers to ‘escape’ and the last one 日 is ‘light‘ or ‘sun‘ and there we come to the literal, yet very poetic meaning of the term komorebi – the sunshine filtering through the leaves of trees.  (from EVS Translations)

komorebe.jpg
 

Building a glass box

 

The vermiculite containment form turned out fine. The plaster/silica investment core turned out fine as well. After several tries I was able to stack the cut-glass strips snugly between the core and box walls. (I forgot to photograph this process.) From this point on, everything that could have gone wrong did go wrong due to bad judgement calls. The glass stuck to the vermiculite form, the glass cracked, and the mess you see below is the result. Do I understand enough at this point to try it again and is it worth it? I haven't decided yet.

IMG_5458.JPG
 
 

Crystal Cove

 

Poem and photos by Marjorie Sanders

I mosey and meander
on the beach at Crystal Cove,
dazzled by the brilliance
of my sparkling treasure trove.
Sequined waves unfurling
hide treasures to behold,
a cymbal-crashing symphony
of diamonds and of gold.

I hear the gemstones clacking
in splendid harmony,
as cast upon the shoreline
they reveal themselves to me.

A fracture teems with critters
encased in slimy green,
emitting tiny bubbles….
a clue to life unseen.

Welcome to my studio

 

My work space is a "mother-in-law" apartment on the lowest level of my house. Double French doors open onto a wide wooden deck, where I do my sawing, grinding and sandblasting... the wet and dirty work. My cold-working machines roll on casters over the threshold onto the deck during the day and back inside at night. The deck overlooks my garden in the foreground and the vast Pacific Ocean beyond.

.